Solo Folio Prototype

I love folders and packets and tiny things that unfold to be useful ones. But I have no real use case for a portable soloing system. I’m so rarely away from my computer it’s probably frightening, haha.

So naturally I’ve been collecting resources for one for ages, just in case. Inspired by this post I finally got around to mocking one up in Silhouette Studio.

Chaos Oracle

I’ve probably posted this before, but I thought it’d be fun in case I didn’t. This is cribbed from Pythia’s fu panel, which is stuffed full of different oracles.

This is what I’ve dubbed “the Chaos oracle” because it makes things 114% (or so) more chaotic. It’s good for answering questions quickly and for throwing a lot of wrinkles into the mix.

Complications & Dangers Chart

I love Lady Blackbird and I am having a passionate thing with Ghost/Echo and I am fondly affectionate towards Otherkind.

But thinking up complications and dangers in play is hard and I feel like I wimp out a lot, going for the easy, Mary Sue complications over the more painful, interesting ones. And I tend to lack variety in my complications because there’s no GM to push and pull against creatively.

In 6 Hours to Midnight one of the Complications for any given roll is already defined for you; you roll or choose from a list. In Ghost/Echo you have a selection of moves that indicate when you’ll roll and there’s an inherent Danger spelled out for each.

So what if there were a nice big 30 element chart you could roll on to pick reasonably sensible complications so you couldn’t wimp out?

Legends and Truth

Inspired by a suggestion on the google+ group for shared solo gaming, I spent the afternoon designing. Yes. The whole afternoon. I made you a pdf of this post.

Edit 12-06: There’s now a systemless version 2.

*Edit 12-7: And a quickstart of version 2.

The Art of Logging

If you happen to read over the various logs I’ve posted, you’ll notice my play style has shifted quite a bit since I first started out experimenting with solo gaming while building Pythia. It’s all part of the natural evolution of practice, of course. I’ve gotten better at some things, improved my tools, dispensed with things I used to think were essential, and discovered a lot about what I like about the process, and what I like in the finished product – and the discrepancy between the two is something I really wrestle with.

Adventures with Traits Three

So I got to thinking, why use any special abilities at all? Why not just go ahead and make everything a trait. So I did. Should I probably just finish slogging through FATE? Probably. But this is more fun.

Warning, only some of this is play-tested yet (which is why it's not published yet). Probably contains at least a few logical errors and mathematical flaws. And the usual disclaimer regarding solo play versus shared play applies – I have no idea how well any of this would work in a group game.

Further Adventures with Traits

Inspired by a post at Last Gasp(link has some NSFW content, LotFP alert) on turning things into dice progressions, I decided to see how many systems I could convert into traits. Hahaha. It turns out everything can be represented by traits if you look at it hard enough.

Warning, almost none of this is play-tested yet (which is why it's not published yet). All theory. All speculation. Probably contains at least a few logical errors and mathematical flaws. And the usual disclaimer regarding solo play versus shared play applies – I have no idea how well any of this would work in a group game.

Imaginary GM System Redux (iGMsr)

So, after a bit more reading and thinking, I’ve come up with a modified version of my iGM system using two d6s (and inspired by Apocalypse World’s “10+/6-“ mechanic) that I think serves the same general purpose as my original concept, but with a clearer way to handle the outcomes as they come up in play.

I wanted to explore the idea of consensus further; if my imaginary GM agrees with me that a path or action is the most interesting one, why should I have to roll for it? As long as it is within the scope of my hero’s abilities and the world’s physics, of course.

Dispensing with Attributes

I’ve said it before: I don’t really like attributes. I’m interested in making characters and playing to see what happens to them, and attributes just seem to get in the way of that.

Never fails – I have a great character backstory, a cool climbing mechanic I want to try, I can practically see the master thief in my mind, and I roll up middling-to-fair barbarian stats instead. I’m playing solo, I can scrap it and start over, but then why don’t I just make the stats up instead of maintaining the fiction that I’m actually rolling them up? Because then it’s not playing by the rules. And then I almost always get annoyed and just fudge it.

Creating Mythic-Style Charts

Inspired by the great Mythic-style charts on the Lone Wolf Roleplaying google+ community over the last few days, I wrote a simple script that uses nltk TextBlob and python to take a text file, sort it by word type, and output each type as a separate, numbered chart.

It’s not perfect; the resulting chart needs quite a bit of curation, but it’s a lot easier than doing it manually!